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Word of Mouth Marketing: Medway Public Library

         Something for Everyone, Something for You!

Structural details

Goals

Our ultimate goal is that people will regularly think to check our events calendar for things that interest them. People will tell each other about our programs and they will end up bringing each other to us.


Audience

External Audiences: Teens, Adults (with or without children), Seniors, Community Groups

Internal Audiences: Trustees, Friends, Staff


Measurables

# of program attendees

# of new program attendees

track anecdotal conversations with patrons. Note when positive or negative feedback is given about a program.

Project description

Team Medway focused their WOMM efforts on library programming. While they hoped to see a marked increase in attendance, they were also interested in creating urgency and getting new visitors.

"The library has programs that are valuable to our patrons based on interest rather than need, we are not the last resort for something to do. We aim to be valuable to all our patron groups (of every age), not just the groups that people generally perceive the library to be intended for (toddlers and parents, adults searching for jobs, etc.)." Team Medway

Communications strategies

Create a logo

Add a tagline to all emails (ie. Medway Library- Something for Everyone, Something for You!)

Utilize Medway Cable Access by making more film promos and posting library event information on their facebook page

Partner with local groups such as Medway Community Farm, schools, Community Ed, Community Kangaroo and Medway Economic development committee

Post more Flyers around town, utilize local facebook pages such Medway Library, Friends of Medway & Town of Medway

And so, how'd it go?

Last summer we offered a Summer Lunch program, modeled somewhat after the USDA program but funded entirely by donations from many local businesses and community organizations. We received sufficient donations to offer the program 3 days/week this summer, an increase from one day/week. An employee of Medway Cable Access now provides user support in the Makerspace for two hours a week. We offer a very popular robotics program, taught by a volunteer. We provide small take-home flyers for most of our programs. A staff member (not on the WOMM team) suggested that we offer a photography club that she runs monthly. This club has been very successful. She also arranged for a presentation by a friend of hers who was on the Great American Baking Show. This presentation was attended by over 80 people, the highest attendance we have ever had during the last 8 years, with the exception of concerts.

And how will you keep the momentum going?

We will work with the new Communication Director. The Town has applied for a grant to purchase two electric vehicles, one of which would go to the Library. This would enable us to get out in the community more, for homebound patrons, to visit schools, and to visit the Farmer's Market in the summer. The Library also received a grant of $10,000 from a medical marijuana growing facility, to provide programs to children and young adults.

And can you talk a little about setbacks, adjustments or lessons learned?

The town's Communication Director left. Though a new Communication Director has been very recently hired, we have not had a chance to meet with him. It is difficult, if not impossible, to separate the impact on library usage due to WOMM from that due to the fact that the (neighboring) Franklin Library was closed for a long period of time. Library usage by out of town residents increased over 30% in FY17 compared to the previous year, but the closure of the Franklin Library surely had a big impact. From conversations with Franklin residents, we know that many of them have continued to frequent the Medway Library even after the Franklin Library reopened. However, it has been difficult to distinguish new patrons from existing ones in looking at program attendance.